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Robert Bilheimer

Robert Bilheimer, President of the non-profit organization Worldwide Documentaries, is one of the most influential documentary filmmakers working in the world today. In 1989, Robert was nominated for an Academy Award for Cry of Reason, a feature-length documentary that profiles the South African anti-apartheid leader Beyers Naude. Since that time, he has made carefully crafted documentary films on a wide range of social, cultural, and humanitarian concern.

Departing from the documentary genre in 1992, Robert also made the definitive film version of Nobel Laureate Samuel Beckett’s play Endgame. He worked from a script prepared especially by the author for the series “Beckett Directs Beckett,” a project of the Smithsonian Visual Press.

 
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Not My Life is the first film to depict the cruel and dehumanizing practices of human trafficking and modern slavery on a global scale.

 

 

 

Visit
notmylife.org

 

Your donation to Worldwide Documentaries will help support the Not My Life Awareness Initiative, a global campaign to create awareness on the issue of human trafficking.

 

Over the past ten years, Robert has made two films-- A Closer Walk, about the global AIDS epidemic, and Not My Life, about human trafficking, that have been hailed as “masterpieces,” and seen by millions of people across a very broad set of global demographics.

 

 

 

International film critics and human rights leaders have focused on both A Closer Walk and Not My Life as examples of Robert’s ability to make documentary films that are at once powerful depictions of tragic human rights issues, and yet are also “beautiful" and “redemptive” works of art. This combination, critics have said, makes him unique among major documentary filmmakers working today. Mike McCarthy, the Senior Producer of CNN International’s Freedom Project, which aired Not My Life in 2011, called the film a  “seminal work.”  Veteran Gannet film critic Jack Garner called the same film “an artful motion picture, and a beautifully told story of suffering and compassion.”

Throughout his career, Robert’s films have attracted an international audience. They have been seen on television in the United States, Canada, Great Britain, Europe, Scandinavia, South Africa and China. His films have also been shown in theaters in the United States and abroad, and exhibited at major film festivals in Toronto, Montreal, Chicago, New York City (Tribeca), Durban, and the XXXVth India International Film Festival in Goa, India.

Robert’s current film, Not My Life, recently received a major distribution grant from the Swedish International Development Agency, and will have its International Premiere in Brussels on October 18, the EU’s Human Trafficking Day. 

As the small staff at Worldwide Documentaries works on the global awareness initiative built around Not My Life, Robert is presently considering new film projects, including a film about post-earthquake Haiti; a film about poverty in the United States; and a film about the post traumatic stress experienced by veterans in the US and abroad of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

 

Early in his career, Robert worked as a freelance journalist and as a professional theatre director. Based in Nairobi, Kenya, he was a stringer for Time magazine and filed regularly for the Nairobi Daily Nation, and Agence France Presse.

In the theatre, Robert has directed more than 30 professional productions in the US, Canada, and East Africa, including a landmark production of Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage” at the Kenya National Theatre.  At the Manitoba Theatre Centre, he was Tony Award winner Len Cariou’s Associate Artistic Director, and was named Director of the Year by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.